The Retirement Boom: Reboot and Reinvent Rather than Retire*

30 Jun

By Sheryl Smolkin

Click here to listen

Click here to listen

Hi. Today I’m interviewing Catherine Allen, co-author of The Retirement Boom for Save with SPP.com. She is Chairman and CEO of the Santa Fe Group, a financial services and technology executive, corporate board director, and expert in cyber security and risk management. Catherine lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Q. Catherine, The Retirement Boom is a book by baby boomers for baby boomers about the transition into a new phase of life. Why did you and your co-authors decide to write the book?
A. Well, all of us are boomers ourselves at various ages within the category. We all have experienced or continue to experience reinvention. We all have a desire to stay involved and to be relevant. In fact, we do retreats and many of our attendees age 55-60 told us, “I really don’t want to retire. I’m not ready to retire. I want to do much more.” That’s what led us to do the research and the book.

Q. Who should read your book and what can they expect to learn from it?
A. First are the boomers, especially those 55 plus, who are concerned about and have a fear that they’ll never be able to retire or that they will run out of money before they pass away. For them it’s both financial and lifestyle planning. Twenty-seven percent of Gen Xers are also very concerned that they too many not be able to retire. Lastly there are many 70 year olds that have retired and told us, “I’m bored. I want to do something different. I want to reinvent myself. I may have 30 more years to live.” By reading the book, financial advisors and corporate HR people can also learn a great deal about the needs of their clients and workforce.

Q. How do you think retirement today for baby boomers is different than it was for their parents 30 or 40 years ago?
A.I see differences in four areas: financial, health, emotional, and government policies.

Thirty or forty years ago many more people had pensions which today are pretty much gone. Most people thought they might live to 70 or maybe 72 or 75. Today because of health care and being fit it’s very likely the boomers will live until 100. That means there are expenditures like travel or entertainment or other things that they want to do that they need to allow for.

Also, when people retired 30 or 40 years ago they did the 3 G’s as I call them. Gardening, grandchildren, and golf. Today people want to stay active, they want to get involved, they want to give back, they want to be a part of the ongoing environment.

Finally, government policies are not keeping up. Government policies have to positively support the aging population instead of being against things like social security or medicare or pensions or even not understanding the impact of aging. Those are all big differences I see from just 30 or 40 years ago.

Q. People spend their whole life with an identity that’s tied to their work. How can they overcome the fear associated with this loss of this identity to better embrace and enjoy their retirement?
A. That’s my favorite subject and it’s about reinvention. You don’t have to keep that same identity. This is a time when you can follow your passions as a way to reinvent your identity. We encourage people to keep their bio and resume and certifications up to speed because you never know when you might want to go back into the work force, especially if it’s a field that you love.

We encourage everybody to have a business card that has their website or their email and telephone number on it so that they feel like they have an identity and that’s who they are. Then lastly, we talk about people having a portfolio career and that means perhaps a third of what they’re doing is earning income by consulting or writing books and so forth. A third of their time is giving back through non-profits. A third of their time is just having fun enjoying and learning about life.

Q. Many people do continue working beyond the normal retirement date. Do you think that most people that are doing this are doing it for love or for money?
A. Well, that’s … It’s hard to tell. I would say 50/50. First of all, they are continuing to work as a form of insurance to keep funding their lifestyle and their retirement because many people believe they will live to 100. Secondly, many people want to remain again, relevant. They want to make a difference, they’re engaged.

The boomers — many of whom are part of the 60s generation — feel like now they finally have time to give back. It might be teaching, it might be mentoring, it might be being active in non-profits either by giving or volunteering or being on boards. Recent research published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health say that the longer people work beyond 65 the less likely they’re to die at that age compared to others who do not work.

And what’s interesting is the numbers go up. At age 72 you’re 56% less likely to die than a 72 year old who is not working. I think that kind of research is going to encourage people to work longer after the age of 65.

Q. What do you mean by retirement robbers and how can retirees avoid them?
A. First of all, the biggest retirement robber might be yourself. They are people that keep you from doing what you want to do. You may have set up goals for retirement so you have time to follow your passions. Now guilt keeps you from enjoying what you said you wanted to do in retirement.

Also there are relatives. You’re retired, so guess what? You’re the one that can do the errands, you might be the caretaker or the “go to” person. We encourage people to try to think of retirement just like thinking about a career. What it is that you want to do, and how do you want to allocate your time? Try to stick to your plan so you are not sabotaging yourself.

Q: You and your co-authors interviewed over 300 people as part of your research for this book. Can you share 1 or 2 of your favorite anecdotes with us?
Well, I’ll start with my dad. He was a small town community banker. He always said he wanted to die with his boots on. That was his way of saying he wanted to be working when he passed away and he did. He was always a role model for me.

We’ve also heard from several women who were stay-at- home wives raising their kids who have gone back to work. Now their husbands have retired and they say things like, “I married you for life but not for lunch.” In other words, just because you’re retired doesn’t mean that it’s up to me to fill all of your time.

Another example is I was on a corporate board with a gentleman who was 92 years old and probably the smartest one of all of us. He wouldn’t say anything until he was ready to say the exactly right thing. There are lots of examples of people well into their 70s, 80s, and even 90s who are still actively involved and engaged in the world.

Q. What are some of the ways retirees can simplify their lives so that they can pursue their passions?
A. Well, start with your own home. Downsize or clean up. There’s a relationship between having less clutter in your mind and less clutter in your home. Try yoga or meditation or journalling. One of my favorites is detaching from technology for a while, whether it’s for a weekend or for a day or even for an entire vacation.

Lastly is relationships. I think as you get older you really want to think about who are the people that are most important to you and surround yourself with those you trust. Plan most of your time to be around these people. I call it sorting friends just like you sort your closet.

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The Retirement Boom: An All Inclusive Guide to Money, Life, and Health in Your Next Chapter can be purchased in paperback or for Kindle on Amazon.com.

*This is an edited transcript of a podcast interview recorded in May 2016.

Jun 27: Best from the Blogosphere

27 Jun

By Sheryl Smolkin

I was noodling around the internet today when I came upon Rock Finance, which scans 200+ articles about money and daily and links to the best ones they think will motivate and inspire readers. Cait Flanders who formerly blogged as “Blonde on a Budget” has partnered with j.money (Budgets are $exy) to populate this site.

Here are a few of the “best money blogs” they have featured recently:
In Revisiting the Latte Factor: The Power of Daily Routine Trent Hamm says giving up your latte and bagel once and saving $8 isn’t a big deal. However, if you cut out 250 purchases, it adds up to $2,000. That’s why he says examining your regular routine and finding ways to save on recurring purchases is important.

Is it ethical to return stuff to the store like the dress you only wore once to the prom or unopened packages of food? When J. Money was a student he gave a used boombox back to Walmart several months after he bought it because he was flat broke and the store had a 90 day return policy. Nevertheless he was very embarrassed and made a vow not to return goods he purchases in future unless he immediately realizes he made a mistake or the goods are damaged.

Mrs. Frugalwoods has WAY more willpower than I do. She says she hasn’t purchased any clothes in 2.5 years and counting. Her initial reasons for enacting a ban on clothes-buying were financial, But then she realized she frequently used to buy clothes more for fun than anything else. And the unexpected benefit of her continuing decision not to buy clothes is that she is increasingly less concerned with her appearance. “I’d much rather save money than buy into the notion that I need to fix my appearance,” she writes .

Mr. Money Mustache offers wealth advice that should be obvious. Some of his colourful suggestions are:

  • Don’t try to gamble your way to wealth.
  • When you get a windfall, it should go straight to your highest interest debt.
  • Don’t buy stuff you can’t afford and don’t need.
  • Don’t pay to have stuff stored.
  • Don’t look at restaurants as an ongoing source of food.
  • Stock up on reasonable amounts of things you use when they go on sale.

And the Financial Samurai writes about slicing through money’s mysteries. He questions why Vacation Money Is Crazy Money. After discussing why his frugal habits fell apart on a recent trip to Paris, he offers some interesting suggestions for controlling vacation spending.

  • Create a budget in Excel.
  • Spend cash for food and entertainment
  • Don’t forget exchange rates
  • Where possible combine business travel and personal travel.

Do you follow blogs with terrific ideas for saving money that haven’t been mentioned in our weekly “Best from the blogosphere?” Share the information on http://wp.me/P1YR2T-JR and your name will be entered in a quarterly draw for a gift card and

 

How to pay off your mortgage sooner

23 Jun

By Sheryl Smolkin

A continuing debate among personal finance pundits is whether you should pay off your mortgage first or save for retirement, particularly in a low risk environment. The fact is you should probably do a little of both as frequently as possible. One strategy some experts advocate is to make an RRSP/SPP contribution and then use your tax return to decrease your mortgage balance, thereby reducing your amortization period and minimizing the total cost of your loan.

But whatever you decide to do, your goal should be to eliminate your mortgage entirely before you retire. By doing so, you will reduce your monthly expenses and minimize the impact the drop in income at retirement will have on your lifestyle.

How much you can pay down your mortgage and when will depend on the terms of the loan secured on your property. That’s why it’s important when you are negotiating or re-negotiating your mortgage to clearly understand the terms and what if any penalties you might incur if you deviate from the prescribed payment schedule.

Here are four ways to pay off your mortgage faster with examples as suggested by the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada:

1. Increase the amount of your payments

One of the ways to pay off your mortgage faster is to increase the amount of your regular payments. Normally, once you increase your payments, you will not be allowed to lower your payments until the end of the term. Check your mortgage agreement or contact your mortgage lender for your payment options.

For example, if John is getting a mortgage of $150,000 amortized over 25 years with a fixed interest rate of 5.45% for five years, minimum monthly payments amortized over 25 years are $911.  If John pays just $50 a month more, it will only take 22.5 years to retire the mortgage and he will save $14,000.

2. Renew at a lower rate, keep payments the same
At the end of your mortgage term, when you renew or renegotiate your mortgage, you may be able to obtain a lower interest rate. Although you will have the option to reduce the amount of your regular payments, you can take advantage of this situation to pay off your mortgage faster. Simply keeping the amount of your payments the same will make you mortgage-free sooner.

Stephanie adopted this strategy when she renewed her $100,000 mortgage after five years and the interest rate dropped from 6.45% to 5.45%. While the lower interest rate would have reduced Stefanie’s monthly payments to $924, she decided to keep the monthly payments at $1,000 in order to reduce the total amount of interest payable over the term of the mortgage.By keeping the monthly payments at $1,000 per month with the lower interest rate for the rest of her mortgage, Stefanie will save over $12,000 and will pay off the mortgage two and a half years sooner.

3. Choose an “accelerated” option for your mortgage payment
You can spend approximately the same amount of money on your mortgage each month and still save money by choosing an accelerated option for making your payments. Most financial institutions offer a number of payment frequency options:

  • Monthly
  • Semi-monthly
  • Biweekly
  • Accelerated biweekly
  • Weekly, and
  • Accelerated weekly

Accelerated weekly and accelerated biweekly payments can save you thousands,  or even tens of thousands in interest charges, because you’ll pay off your mortgage much faster using these options. The reason is that you make the equivalent of one extra monthly payment per year.

Let us assume that Richard has a mortgage of $150,000, amortized over 25 years, with a constant interest rate of 6.45%. If he chooses an accelerated payment frequency equivalent to one extra monthly payment a year, Richard will pay off his mortgage over four years sooner and save more than $29,000 in interest over the amortization period.

4. Making lump-sum payments: Prepayments
A prepayment is a lump-sum payment that you make, in addition to your regular mortgage payments, before the end of your mortgage term. The prepayment reduces your outstanding balance and allows you to pay off your mortgage faster.The sooner you can make the prepayment, the less interest you will pay over the long term, and the sooner you will be mortgage-free.

5. Key things to remember:

  • Your mortgage agreement will specify whether you can make prepayments, when you can do so and other related terms or conditions. Read it carefully, and ask your mortgage lender to explain anything you don’t understand.
  • If your mortgage lender is a federally-regulated financial institution such as a bank, as of January 2010, it must show your prepayment options in an information box at the beginning of your mortgage agreement.
  • Your mortgage agreement may specify minimum and maximum amounts that you can prepay each year without paying a fee or penalty.
  • The prepayment option is generally not cumulative. In other words, if you did not make a prepayment on your mortgage this year, you will not be able to double your prepayment next year.
  • A closed mortgage agreement may require you to pay a penalty or fee for any prepayment.

Jun 20: Best from the Blogosphere

20 Jun

By Sheryl Smolkin

After several weeks of “theme” issues it’s time to check in with some of our favourite bloggers to find out what’s on their mind.

On Boomer and Echo, Marie Engen asks the perennial question RRIF Or Annuity? Which One Is Right For You?  She suggests combining both so an annuity covers your basic retirement expenses together with with your CPP, OAS, and any other pension income you may be receiving to give you a guaranteed income stream for life. This allows your RRIF to provide you with investment growth opportunities and easier access to your money for your more enjoyable lifestyle expenses.

Tax Freedom Day 2016 happened June 7th this year. Retire Happy’s Jim Yih says it’s another reason to celebrate summer. He explains where all of your taxes go because once you realize the severity of tax on your lifestyle, it is your job to investigate legitimate ways to reduce your tax bill. “I’ve often said that good tax planning is the foundation to any financial, investment or estate decision,” Yih concludes.

Bridget Eastgaard lives in Calgary where due to the drop in oil prices the rental market is very soft. On her blog Money After Graduation she shares One Simple Shortcut To Put More Money In Your Budget. Her research revealed a similar unit renting for $250 less in her building plus a half-dozen comparable apartments renting nearby for less. She succeeded in lowering her rent by 20%, saving hundreds of dollar a month that will be redirected to accumulating a down payment on a house.

Sean Cooper thinks Millennials Should Save Their Down Payment and Not Rely on the Bank of Mom and Dad. He says by showing your millennial child tough love, you’re teaching your kids a valuable lesson: not everything in life will be handed to them on a silver platter. Just like you did, he says they should to work for it.You won’t be there to help them forever.

And the Big Cajun Man Alan Whitten reminds readers to keep an eye on their bank account to make sure automatic withdrawals are being processed properly on an ongoing basis. When he checked on his son’s RESP recently, he found that TD Bank mysteriously stopped depositing in November of 2015. There has been a problem ticket opened on this issue, and someone will be getting back to him.

Do you follow blogs with terrific ideas for saving money that haven’t been mentioned in our weekly “Best from the blogosphere?” Share the information on http://wp.me/P1YR2T-JR and your name will be entered in a quarterly draw for a gift card.

 

8 reasons for taking your vacation in Canada

16 Jun

By Sheryl Smolkin

An article I read in the Globe & Mail this week noted that the Canadian tourism industry is grappling with a demographic problem that could threaten its future. Apparently millennials are spending far more of their travel dollars outside the country than at home. One reason cited is that it is so expensive to fly within Canada, it makes sense to go further afield.

I can understand that most of us would love to be able to jet off somewhere warm to get away from our frigid winters. But in spite of seasonal mosquitoes and black flies in some parts of the country, Canadian spring and summers at their best are not to be missed.  So in the hope of persuading more of you to spend at least a couple of vacation weeks a year exploring closer to home, here are eight reasons in no particular order why I think you should consider some domestic travel along with the international adventures on your bucket list.

  1. Mobility rights
    You don’t need a passport or a visa to travel from one end of our vast country to the other. With the exception of arcane laws forbidding the import of alcohol between provinces, you can buy anything you want and take it home without worrying about declaring your goods or paying duty. Medicare insurance coverage varies from one province to another, but your health card will generally be accepted across the country. Nevertheless, travel insurance is still a good idea to fill in any coverage gaps like air ambulance in the case of illness or an accident.
  2. See Canada first
    Tourists come from all over the world to see our country, but many of us are looking for “exotic experiences” elsewhere. The fact is that every region in Canada has its own unique attractions. Unless you have seen the snow-capped Rockies, skated on the canal in Ottawa or visited Peggy’s Cove you cannot fully appreciate the beauty of this diverse country and how well it compares with foreign destinations.
  3. They speak your language(s)
    Travelling in Canada can be so much less complicated than going to Europe or Asia because you don’t have to worry about making yourself understood. Even if you decide to visit Quebec, most of us studied some French in school and can get by. And if Air Canada loses your luggage or you need to see a doctor for an unexpected ailment, you will be able to explain the problem without the benefit of an interpreter.
  4. Spend Canadian dollars
    In January of this year, the Canadian dollar sunk to new lows. It has bounced up and down since then, but the fact is if you have to exchange it for U.S. dollars or euros to pay for a trip, it’s going to cost you a lot more than a few years ago. It’s a great time to see your country and support our economy.
  5. Meet great people
    Whether they live north, south, east or west, your Canadian neighbours are great people. They will go out of their way to show you around, invite you into their homes and make sure you have a terrific visit. With few exceptions, you can feel confident that whether you travel alone, with a companion or as part of a family you are vacationing in a safe, welcoming place.
  6. Festivals and special events
    Theatre, music, comedy, film and literary festivals abound. Whatever you are interested in, you can time your visit to catch concerts and live performances. Here is a listing of the top ten summer music festivals in Saskatchewan, but from the Symphony Splash in Victoria B.C. to the Stratford Shakespearean Festival in Ontario to the Shelbourne County Lobster Festival in Nova Scotia there are hundreds of local events across the country you can plan your vacation around.
  7. The great outdoors
    Frequently whether we travel at home or overseas, we just fly from one city to the next. But there are about 2.6 million lakes and 5 mountainous ecozones in Canada. To really see the country, get into your car and drive in any direction. Whether in a tent, yurt, airstream, pod, igloo, hut, villa, cabin, cube, teepee or treehouse, camping or glamping (upscale camping) are excellent ways to experience the great outdoors.
  8. Multi-cultural cites
    Canada recently welcomed over 25,000 Syrian refugees. That is in addition to the thousands and thousands of immigrants and refugees from all over the world who have found a home here over the last 149 years. As a result, you can sample the cuisine and experience the culture of their homeland right around the block or down the street. Within walking distance of my house in Toronto I can eat Chinese, Indian, Iranian, Japanese, Hungarian, Korean, and Greek cuisine and then head over to a Jewish delicatessen.

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Do you have a Canadian vacation planned this summer? Send us your favourite pictures with a short paragraph telling us where you went and describing the high points. With your permission, we’d love to share your images and your story.

Jun 13: Best from the Blogosphere

13 Jun

By Sheryl Smolkin

Next week Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau will again be meeting with provincial and territorial finance ministers to talk about options for improving Canada Pension Plan benefits. This protracted discussion has been going on for as long as I can remember, but the hurdles remain the same.

CPP changes require the support of Ottawa plus seven of the 10 provinces representing two-thirds of the population. When the finance ministers last met in December 2015, Ontario which is currently going at it alone, PEI, Manitoba, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick gave CPP improvements a “thumbs up.” Quebec, B.C. Saskatchewan and Alberta vetoed the idea.

Here are some links to recent articles in the mainstream media that will bring you up-to-date on the various arguments made by stakeholders in the debate.

Larry Hubich, president of the Saskatchewan Federation of Labour says the proportion of their incomes that Canadians put into CPP, and will someday get back as pension payments, “is not enough.” Nevertheless he is optimistic since many Canadian politicians — including Prime Minister Justin Trudeau — agree there’s a pension problem because many Canadians can’t retire on what they’ll get from the CPP under current rates.

After the finance ministers met in December 2015, Dan Kelly, president and CEO of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB), and Marilyn Braun-Pollon, Saskatchewan vice-president of CFIB told the Regina Leader-Post that small business owners are relieved that Canada’s finance ministers have put plans to expand the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) on hold. “They are relieved but they’ve expressed a desire to see a shift in the conversation,” Braun-Pollon said.

The Globe and Mail reports that a coalition of business groups and youth advocates is calling for an expanded Canada Pension Plan, but only if it is targeted at middle-income levels. The coalition argues that higher premiums to pay for more generous retirement benefits should kick in at annual earnings of about $27,500. They argue helping Canadians who earn less than that is better accomplished through Old Age Security and the related Guaranteed Income Supplement.

The Ontario government recently announced it is delaying the introduction of its Ontario Retirement Pension Plan until 2018 while it negotiates with the federal government and other provinces on an enhanced CPP. However, at this point, the government says it still intends to proceed with the ORPP as it’s unlikely that all provinces can agree on a CPP enhancement large enough to take the place of the ORPP. Here’s what you need to know about the ORPP:

And Fred Vettese, the Chief Actuary of Morneau Shepell writes in the Financial Post that he is actually in favour of CPP expansion if it is done right. He says one thing it will certainly do is to raise the under-savers (and there are many of them) closer to the standard of living they enjoyed while working. The unanswered question is how much closer should they be without having to save on their own?

Do you follow blogs with terrific ideas for saving money that haven’t been mentioned in our weekly “Best from the blogosphere?” Share the information on http://wp.me/P1YR2T-JR and your name will be entered in a quarterly draw for a gift card and

 

10 questions to ask before your wedding

9 Jun

By Sheryl Smolkin

According to weddingbells 65% of weddings in Canada take place between June and September with 25% of weddings taking place in the month of August. I don’t know the month when the most divorces are granted, but according to 2008 data from Statistics Canada (the last year for which it was reported), the divorce rate has been relatively stable for the last 20 years, fluctuating between 35% and 42%.

Now don’t get me wrong. I’m a big fan of marriage. In November of this year we will celebrate our 40th anniversary. But considering what’s at stake, it’s well worth asking your prospective spouse a few important questions before you say, “I do,” so you don’t have to unravel the whole thing a few years later when you realize what you really meant was, “I don’t.”

Here are 10 things I thought of. No doubt you can think of others:

  1. Religion: How important is religion to each of you? If you are of different religions will one of you convert? If you have children, in which faith will you bring them up?
  2. Children: Do both of you want children? How many? How soon? If you cannot have children together is it a deal breaker? Would you consider adoption if all else fails?
  3. Childcare: Did one of your parents stay at home to care for you and your siblings? Do you believe there should be one stay at home parent in each family? If so, which one?
  4. Abortion: Legally a woman gets to make the decision if she is going to terminate a pregnancy. She may make this decision in a variety of difficult circumstances including personal health problems, lack of viability of the child or if she was a victim of rape. Do both parties share the same personal and/or religious views about abortion?
  5. Debt: There is nothing that can take the shine off a relationship faster than finding out later rather than sooner that one or both partners have significant credit card, student loan or other consumer debt. Be completely open about the state of both of your finances and consider how to get them in order before you walk down the aisle.
  6. Money management: How will you pay the family bills? Will each of you contribute the same amount monthly or pro-rate expenses based on income levels? Will you consolidate your finances or maintain different bank accounts? Who will be responsible for managing and reconciling accounts on a regular basis?
  7. Pre-nup: Is one of you older or more affluent? Have one or both of you been married before? Is one of you part owner of a family business? In these circumstances your prospective spouse may ask you to sign a pre-nuptial agreement giving up some of your rights on divorce. If so, be realistic and get independent legal advice before you agree.
  8. City vs. country: Where will you live? Are you willing to trade off a smaller apartment in the city for a detached house in the suburbs and a daily two-hour commute? Is living in a rural area on a huge lot a priority or is it important to you to be part of an urban community?
  9. Household chores: Are both of you neat freaks or is one of you a slob? Who is going to do what in the home and how often? If both of you are working are you open to hiring someone to do regular house cleaning for you?
  10. Resolving conflict: Can you discuss your feelings openly? Every couple has disagreements. How will you handle yours? Are you willing to consider counseling if problems arise the two if you can’t handle easily?

Relationships are dynamic and the discussions you have before the big day are not cast in stone. But if you build your life together based on open communication and shared values, chances are greater that when you encounter inevitable roadblocks down the road you will find a way to work together to overcome these obstacles.

 

Jun 6: Best from the Blogosphere

6 Jun

By Sheryl Smolkin

This weekend I happened to be in Ottawa when Run Ottawa was taking place. Over 47,000 runners did 2 km, 5 km, 10 km, half marathon and marathon runs in unseasonably hot weather – over 35°C!  We cheered on my daughter who ran 5 kms and it was also wonderful to see so many parents and very young children running hand in hand.

Because Canadian summers are so short, we all want to take advantage of them to do as many outdoor sports and activities as possible. So in this week’s Best from the Blogosphere I direct you to blogs/articles offering safe summer exercising hints.

In 8 tips for exercising in summer heat , Joe Decker advocates staying hydrated, wearing loose, light-coloured clothing and replenishing your electrolyte and salt intake while exercising.

Summer fitness dos and don’ts by Corrie Pikul suggests that you don’t protein-load before your workout because too much protein before a sweat session could elevate your basal temperature, making you feel even hotter. She says you are better off saving the protein bar for after your workout, when it will help you rebuild muscle.

Love Your Summer Workout: 10 Motivation Tricks by Hallie Levine Sklar recommends that you find a shady route if possible and try to walk, run, or cycle on dirt or gravel paths, since asphalt and concrete tend to radiate heat and reflect the sun’s rays, making you feel warmer.

Carolyn Williams  in 5 tips to keep you working out all summer long says a fitness buddy will help keep you from getting distracted by all the other tempting activities summer has to offer instead of exercising. She reminds us to stretch before running to help avoid injuries and set summer goals so workouts become more meaningful.

And finally, 24 tips for a fitter summer vacation by Kissairis Munoz gives lots of hints for healthy summer travel including try to avoid adding in extra meals to compensate for jetlag, beware of buffets and plan a getaway around a fitness event or competition like thousands of visitors to Ottawa who ran this past weekend did!

Lorna Hegarty: Educating teens about money

2 Jun

By Sheryl Smolkin

Click here to listen

Click here to listen

Today I’m interviewing Lorna Hegarty for savewithspp.com. Lorna has been the President of LCH Resources Ltd. for almost a decade. She has an international consulting practice in human resources, executive coaching and training as well as being a published author. She co-authored The Wealthy Teen with her daughter Carly when she was 15 (she is now 24), and the third edition was recently released.

Q: Writing a book is a serious undertaking. What motivated you to write and update The Wealthy Teen twice?
A: The reason for writing The Wealthy Teen was that as I was raising my two boys I noticed there was such a difference between how the two of them handled money. One would rush and spend his allowance as quickly as possible and the other one would save it. We had conversations around how to handle money and how to save money. I always let them make their own choices. When my daughter Carly came along, there was another way of looking at money and values and how to, as a parent, influence her to think about saving and spending money. I started taking some notes and ended up turning them into a book.

Q: What does wealthy mean to you? Is it all about the money?
A: Not at all. There are so many different ways to be wealthy. The true meaning of wealth is to be grateful and respect the gifts that you have. You can have wealth if you’ve got happiness, health and great relationships, spiritual connections, or creativity. If you are a teen that is   wealthy, you understand and appreciate these gifts.

Q: Your book is not a traditional personal finance book. In fact, you don’t really start talking about accumulating, managing, and earning money until the second half. Why do you begin by having parents and children work through their attitudes about money?
A: Well, money is a really personal concept and it begins with the history of how you were brought up to view money and how money conversations happened in your home. That’s why the first part of the book is dedicated to why you think the way you do, where it came from in your history and what assumptions you have that could be correct or incorrect. I offer an  opportunity for parents or mentors to write down where their views and thoughts about money came from to help them work through the book with their teenager or any other person.

Q: Kids often resist direction from their parents. How can parents engage their children in a dialogue in order to educate them about good saving and spending habits?
A: Well, for me, the best way to engage my children was to tell them stories of how I grew up with money. An example was when I was 10 years old I wanted to purchase a dog from my neighbor. They had a litter, and the dog cost $70. My parents were smart enough to say that I could have the dog but only if I earn $70. So I joined Regal Gifts. I got a few catalogues and pretty much through selling cards and wrapping paper door to door and to friends and family, I was able to raise enough money to buy the puppy. This approach is something I taught my children — they need to really work hard to get what they want.

Q: How soon is too soon? At what age can parents start teaching their children about money?
A: Well, I like the physical aspect of money. I like that I can hold it, I can put it in my wallet, I can see how much I have left on me. For example, if a child does a chore, something easy like cleaning up, you can reward them with a little bit of cash. When would that be? When they’re three or when they’re four. I’ll give you an example.

As I was growing up, we had a stone driveway and it was a really big task in the spring to take the stones that had been shoveled out with the snow onto the grass and put them back onto the driveway. From a really young age, I would say three or four, my parents showed me what to do to take the rocks off of the grass and put them back onto the driveway, and I would get paid 25 cents for doing that and for other little things that did.

I could see the money that we put into a jar and I could see that it was growing. I think the earlier the better when it comes to teaching children about money.

Q: How important are goals? When should young people start setting goals and objectives?
A: Well, I’m going to say pretty much the same thing as the last question you asked — as early as possible. Also, it’s really important to make goals fun. As an example, let’s just say Father’s Day is coming up, so we’re going to set a goal of spending $10 and we’re going to make something special for father. That would involve a trip to the dollar store to look for materials so the child can have some fun with the adult and make a gift that says “I love you.” When a realistic goal like this is achieved, the child and the adult can celebrate the accomplishment.

Q: You discussed developing “E” potential in your book. What does that mean and why is it important?
A: Well, “E” potential is gaining entrepreneurial capability which is really open to anybody. Some of the examples that come to mind are setting up a lemonade stand or selling books or babysitting at a young age before a teen can get a regular summer job, but being aware that they have the potential to earn money. It doesn’t mean they’ve got to work Monday to Friday, 9:00 to 5:00.

Q: Tell me about the principle of the five baskets. How can it help kids to manage their money?
A: Okay, well, savings is 10%, fun is 10%, charity is 10%, investment is 20%, and essentials are 50%. In the book, I suggest having separators or little baskets to put their money in. Of course, young children may not have all the baskets, because they don’t have to pay for essentials like shelter, food or utilities.

Again, I think it’s so important for kids be able to actually handle money when they are younger so they can see physically where it’s going and how it’s being accounted for. Now, for older teens, obviously, bank accounts are ok.

My daughter still uses five different banking accounts to manage her money so obviously, it isn’t sitting in jars at home. After all these years she finds that it is a really good way of watching how her vacation fund is growing and planning where she will go.

Q: How successful have the strategies you describe in your book been in educating your own three children about money?
A: That’s a good question too. They’ve pretty much followed the rules and the principles from The Wealthy Teen. Carly is very, very disciplined. All three of them have always got their eyes and ears open for something they could do that would be fun, exciting, and interesting but also earn them some extra money.

Over the years, I would say that they’ve all pretty much taken the pieces they really believe in and they’ve had fun doing it, seen results, and incorporated them into their own and their partners’ lives.

Q: What reactions have you had from both mentors and young people who have read your book and worked through the exercises?
Well, I’ve had really good feedback. I’ve had couples tell me that they’ve used The Wealthy Teen as a discussion guide before they got married, to have a conversation about money. I’ve had feedback from readers who have used the system for saving money for school, for a trip to Europe, or for a car. It works if you have the ability to stick with it and save to reach your goals.

Q: If you had one message for adults who want to educate their teens about money, what would it be?
A: My favorite question. I strongly suggest that adults be careful with what and how much they give to their children or their teens so youth will appreciate things much more when they have skin in the game or when they’ve learned something.

In the past, I’ve seen family with children, teenagers, young adults, and they shower their children with designer clothes and the best phones. I would tell them to make sure they are living within their own means and as adults, teach their teens to understand the value of money and let them earn it when they want to purchase something.

02Jun-TheWealthyTeen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The third edition for The Wealthy Teen can be purchased from Amazon in paperback editions and for Kindle.

May 31: Best from the blogosphere

31 May

By Sheryl Smolkin

This morning when I took the dog for a walk I saw tulips, begonias, apple blossoms, pansies and rhododendrons and that was just in my own yard. My husband has a green thumb and knows how happy I am surrounded by flowers.

He also grows vegetables, so he and his good friend Russ pour over seed catalogues looking for heritage tomatoes and other delectable treats beginning in September. By March they can’t resist at least a couple of visits to the garden centre.

The official start of the gardening season in Canada is the May long weekend, so many of you have already planted hardy seedlings that you may have started inside under lights. But regardless of whether you have yet to put a spade in the ground, it’s always great to get advice from the experts.

And some avid gardeners like to write as much as they love to grow things. Believe it or not, there was even a Garden Bloggers Conference at the Beverley Hilton in Los Angeles earlier this month. Here is the GBC list of lists (albeit U.S.) of top garden blogs.

Here are some other great gardening blogs we found:

Gardens by Laura of Calgary Gardening Services supports sustainable gardening practices.  In a nutshell, she says her company follows practices that will allow future generations to meet their needs by attempting to protect, restore, and enhance landscapes to provide ecosystems that benefit humans and other organisms.

You Grow Girl was launched by Gayla Trail in February 2000 and has grown into a thriving project that speaks to a contemporary, laid-back approach to organic gardening that places equal importance on environmentalism, style, affordability, art, and humour.

In mid-May, Melissa J. Will, the self-styled Empress of Dirt  wrote about how to start a new garden pond for anyone installing a small (under 1000 gallons – about the size of 10-person hot tub or less) prefab garden pond or other little container pond on a patio or balcony.

For those of you in apartments or condos, balcony gardener focuses on smaller-scale gardening. She says, “My downtown city balcony garden is all about containers. It’s a different garden every year. It’s small. I spend a lot less time pulling weeds and watering. It’s fun, it’s challenging and it’s easy to try new things.”

Nikki Jabbour is part of the blogging team at Savvy Gardening. She has some interesting vertical vegetable gardening ideas to boost growing space, reduce insect and disease problems, and beautify decks and patios. In her veggie plot, she uses structures like trellises, stakes, and obelisks. These support vining tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, gourds, peas, and pole beans. But, she also has a vertical vegetable garden on her back deck and patio.

Finally, take a look at Little Green Fingers: A first-hand account of gardening with kids. Several charming recent posts discuss cake decorating with edible flowers, growing pea shoots with children and how to make ice mobiles.